sdgscotland.com invites you to action network Glasgow University's 3 most important alumni of SUSTAINABILITY GENERATION Adam Smith James Watt, FAZLE ABED ..partners of abeduni.com include:
  • U Last Mile Health

  • U Early Childhood

  • U finance to end poverty


  • let's celebrate triple-win economics=
    end poverty*grow middle class*go green

SDG 5  4  3   2  1  0 welcome to Asia and the top 5 sdgoals 50 years search scaling the most exciting collaborations women-led communities empower
INDUSTRIAL REV 260th GAMES-cards of sdg-gen
..
diary: next UN sdg-games
250th year review of moral sentiments and industrial revolution
.
www.ukcop26.org/volunteer

green economics- the younger half of the world's only hope
Coming soon Fieldbook of Fazle Abed and 1 billion girls empowerment. I see these as 7 chapters of the fieldbook of Abed and womens nation building. Are you able to see if Shameran Abed agrees these are close to honoring his father's purpose or do you want me to do that?
Chapter 1 Ending poverty with financial services - Chapter 2 Ending famine with village agriculture and 100% employment of women geared to community building and celebrating nation's market/entrepreneurial advantages
Chapter 3 Raising life expectancy from 25 below to close to world norms through maximising last mile health service capacity with collaboration focus on affordable life-shaping solutions for infants and mothers
Chapter 4 Education designed to value's the (girl/boy) child's life, love of self, communal dignity of everyone as an action learner and livelihood co-creator Chapter 5 Community as (global village) platform search for collaboration in resiliency and family-led conscious effort to respect every person and nature's dynamics Chapter 6 Did Abed discover optimal framework matching The Economist's 150 year searching for Entrepreneurial Revolution ie a third movement to mediate historic empires, big politics and big corporate through intergenerational and inter-hemisphere sharing of advances in engineering. Specifically matching Von Neumann's definition of industrial revolution 3 as era of above zero-sum value exchange modeling coherent with 100 times more tech per 8 decades 1945-2025 compounding to everyone's collaborative and natural advantage. Chapter 7 Exploring Abed's checklist of the most urgent work to be done through the decade after his passing and purpose of the younger half of the world in connecting first true decade of sustainability generation through hi-trust behaviors and borderless transparency of data mapping integrating every GPS
welcome to SDGscotland.com lifelong action learning on ending poverty, celebrating health #AIforgood (glasgow's 260th year of first engineer james watt & first IR economist adam smith): growing green:
America's john kerry: glasgow november is humanity's last best chance ...economistdiary.com next un zoom -2021 year of living dangerously close to extinction -
THANKS be TO Glasgow U alumn fazle abed- small may be beautiful but in ending poverty, large scale coalition empowering women community building is essential..1billiongirls.com asks how many 1 billion dollar sdg investments a year can women empowerment coalitions inspire: brac bangladesh billion dollar microfinance loans ; abed ultra poor billion dollar grants a year; bkash billion dollar cashless banking for poor ; brac bank billion dollar youth engagement and sme city bank; billion dollars of lowest cost remittances; billion dollar investments in each of 5 ages of schooling ; billion dollar vaccine empowering poorest families grants ; 10 agricultural value chains whose crop sxcience and ai data is networked around poorest asian farmers...


Saturday, January 30, 2021

CROW UPD BEV 2021

 

Opinion: The untapped role of universities in scaling innovation

ASU has partnered with USAID, the Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, and civil society and private sector partners to strengthen the university’s capacity to support effective supply chains in Ghana and across Africa. Photo by: ASU

As institutions tasked with the specific purpose of generating, synthesizing, and transmitting knowledge, research universities play a unique role in national and global innovation systems. Through new forms of engagement with the broader development community — especially donors and global foundations — innovative universities throughout the world can, and must, work together to co-create solutions to local challenges and scale them up to meet the needs of the world’s most vulnerable.

Donor agencies have long looked to universities for their obvious expertise in higher education; but what has become clearer — especially in the past decade — is that those committed to global development can work alongside higher education institutions in low- and middle-income countries to co-create research-based, socially responsive, and scalable innovations. Global research universities must prioritize engagement and collaboration with universities and stakeholders throughout these countries to help build their capacity to lead in research and innovation-led solutions to solve core societal problems.

Q&A: How COVID-19 can help reshape access to higher education

While COVID-19 has generated the most severe disruption to global education in history, it has also presented new opportunities. Devex spoke to ASU’s vice president of global academic initiatives about how the pandemic is reshaping access to higher education.

Governments and funders — including aid agencies, foundations, and corporations — should support these efforts through strategies and initiatives that fully engage the immense knowledge creation capacity of universities to address poverty reduction, public health, access to education, economic growth, governance, and sustainability.

Scaling solutions through local higher education institutions

Designing solutions that work at social scale requires precise alignment between the vision of innovators and complex real-world demands across many different contexts: local higher education institutions are ideally situated to understand needs and opportunities within their own communities. Although these institutions are closely connected to government ministries and bring expertise across disciplines, they often lack the financial, organizational, and infrastructural capacity for solutions-oriented research that can be translated into impact at the national, regional, and global level.

Devex World 2020: Innovation at Scale: Rethinking the Design of Higher Education. Via YouTube.

Many top research universities bring significant assets for strengthening the ability of higher learning institutions in LMICs to meet these demands. Spanning education, research, government, and the private sector, forward-thinking research universities bring vast networks and connectivity to many organizations, and increasingly, their reach extends globally.

The most effective global research universities have designed pathways for moving innovations into society through innovative approaches to research translation, technology transfer, organizational design, and programming. These approaches can be adapted to partner with and strengthen higher education institutions in LMICs.

The role of universities in tackling social challenges

Although universities have been engaged in development implementation for decades, some of their most significant advantages — in comparison to traditional implementers — remain underutilized. First, they are uniquely suited to help institutions in LMICs become more effective, not only in teaching and learning, but also in restructuring research enterprises and mounting effective responses to economic and social needs.

Secondly, they bring experience in translating research into action through partnerships, entrepreneurship, and engagement with communities.

Finally, they can act as enduring partners to local universities and communities long after projects are concluded, creating opportunities for future collaborations, coordinating and enabling access to international resources, and driving equitable knowledge exchange over the long term.

An increasing number of universities throughout high-income countries are already partnering with higher education institutions in LMICs to build capacity to respond to national and regional development challenges. Universities such as Arizona State University and the member institutions of the PLuS Alliance, for example, have not only redesigned their own operations to have a transformative impact on society, but are also committed to working with other universities to design new innovative approaches to meet the needs of the communities and countries they serve.

ASU has partnered with the U.S. Agency for International Development, the Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, and civil society and private sector partners to strengthen the university’s capacity to support effective supply chains in Ghana and across Africa. Strengthening supply chain knowledge and capacity helps support the massive efforts of governments and communities across health, food security, and economic growth.

ASU is also advancing these partnerships within the framework of “university design” — the application of design principles to the missions, operations, and cultures of higher education institutions to allow them to meaningfully address societal challenges. ASU is catalyzing transformation in global higher education through the University Design Institute, which has already worked with over 60 institutions in 15 countries to co-create locally driven approaches to address development challenges.

Realizing the full potential of universities as development actors requires universities in high-income countries to make bold commitments to global engagement and to intentionally leverage their knowledge and resources to support institutions in emerging countries. Donor organizations and agencies also play a key role in enabling partnerships that foster scalable, local innovation. Through new and expanded opportunities and programs, donors and institutions of higher learning across the world can collaborate to help the universities become leaders in local and regional development.

Catch up on Devex World 2020 conversations and insights.

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